The Way We Take Photos Has Changed, But What Ansel Adams Brought To The Craft Hasn’t

By Robin Lubbock https://www.wbur.org/artery
Leaning close into Ansel Adams’ photograph “Canyon de Chelly National Monument,” created in 1942, I saw the fine dark outline of a tree, far away, down by the river. It was so clear, and so sharp, I felt like I could reach out my hand and gently lift it from the valley floor.

I’ve been making images professionally almost all of my adult life, and like so many of us today, I have a camera in my pocket at all times, and I document life as I go. Making pictures is easy these days. But it wasn’t always that way, and as I walked from print to print through the Museum of Fine Arts’ “Ansel Adams In Our Time” exhibition, I could feel the excitement of a very different era of photography pulling me along, my heart in my throat. It took me back to my days of black and white photography, pushing film into cameras, bathing it in developer, printing on glossy paper in the red light of a darkroom, and letting the soft illumination of an enlarger play through my fingers as I struggled to get the print I wanted….read more