View Daily Life in a Japanese-American Internment Camp Through the Lens of Ansel Adams

In 1943, one of America’s best-known photographers documented one of the best-known internment camps.

Prisoners read newspapers at the Manzanar Relocation Center, a Japanese American internment camp during World War II.

Seventy-five years ago, nearly 120,000 Americans were incarcerated because of their Japanese roots after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. More than 10,000 were forced to live in the hastily built barracks of Manzanar—two thirds of whom were American citizens by birth. Located in the middle of the high desert in California’s Eastern Sierra region, Manzanar would become one of the best-known internment camps—and in 1943, one of America’s best-known photographers, Ansel Adams, documented daily life there.

Japanase Family at home in Manzanar Internment Camp

As Richard Reeves writes in his history of Japanese-American internment, Adams was friends with the camp’s director, who invited him to the camp in 1943. A “passionate man who hated the idea of the camps,” he hoped to generate sympathy for the internees by depicting the stark realities of their lives. As a result, many of his photos paint a heroic view of internees—people “born free and equal,” as the title of his book collecting the photos insists.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/view-daily-life-japanese-american-internment-camp-through-lens-ansel-adams-180962307/#tRTRDw4Qx9ETwp0U.99

Banish the winter doldrums with a museum outing

Shake off those January blahs and warm the soul by checking out some of the current art exhibits on view through the area. Local museums offer a wide range of exhibits that are sure to help keep winter in the background for a while. Here’s a sampling.

Photography retrospective at Nassau County Museum of Art
Nassau County Museum of Art has mounted a vast photo exhibition — three exhibits in all — that showcase the history of photography and its influence over the past 100 years. Read more at liherald.com …

Ansel Adams: Sight and Feeling
Ansel Adams’ ability to create photographs with a remarkable range and subtlety of tones is legendary. Yet for all his technical mastery, Adams recognized that what made a compelling photograph was far more elusive. This exhibit of Adams’ photographs from the KIA collection suggests how his intuitive and emotional response to the landscape resulted in powerful and enduring photographs.

Adams is, of course, a big draw for visitors. “These iconic classic, majestic images (25 of them in all) are incredibly moving,” says Dr. Willers. “His technical abilities are so profound. Throughout the exhibit, the print quality is extraordinary and Adams provides great insight into photo processes.”

Light Works: 100 Years of Photos
From Eadweard Muybridge’s 19th-century photographic studies of animal locomotion to Richard Misrach’s contemporary chromogenic prints, this exhibit — also from KIA — spans the history of photography through 39 images. Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Curtis, Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange, Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon, Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson and many other celebrated photographers comprise this survey of photography processes and subjects from 1873 to 2000.

“The exhibit defines the phenomena of how photography evolved and took its place alongside painting, printing and sculpture in the arts,” says Dr. Willers. “The prints from KIA are the most well preserved I have seen. Their quality is extraordinary and that makes a difference in appreciating the full power of photography. These photos reach out and grab you.”

Ansel Adams’ Camera Highlights Photography Offerings at Heritage Auctions

cameraNEW YORK — The camera used a half-century ago by legendary photographer and environmentalist Ansel Adams will be offered in a public auction in New York City by Heritage Auctions’ Photographs auction, October 27. The Arca-Swiss 4×5 inch view camera (est. $70,000-$100,000) was used by Adams for shooting the well-known 1968 image Arches, North Court, Mission San Xavier Del Bac in Tucson, Arizona and other famous photographs of that era.

“This is the only Ansel Adams’ view camera ever offered at auction,” said Nigel Russell, Heritage Auctions Director of Photography. “After he used this camera between 1964 and 1968 he gave it to his assistant, Lillian DeCock, who also became a distinguished photographer. This camera and equipment, along with four other cameras used by DeCock and her husband, were consigned by her heirs.”…read more

Fragile Waters at IMA

It was the Deep Water Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that inspired two friends to create IMA’s newest show. Curator Jeanne Falk-Adams and Barbara Cox, artist agent, created Fragile Waters at IMA April 23 – Sept. 5.

“We need water, clean water. It isn’t possible to live without it,” said Falk-Adams.

The idea behind Fragile Waters, Falk-Adams said, was to connect people through the arts, portraying the beauty of water, from rivers and wetlands to the oceans, letting them draw their own conclusions. To accomplish this, the show combines the work of her father in-law, Ansel Adams, Ernest Brooks II and Dorothy Kerper Monnelly, interspersed with quotes to give people what Falk-Adams describes as breathing room, to process the information.

Focus on Ansel Adams at South Shore Arts Gallery

The love affair began with a Kodak No. 1 Box Brownie when Ansel Adams was just 14 in 1916.

A shy boy, home-schooled by his father and grandmother in San Francisco, Adams toted the camera to the Yosemite Valley on a trek that would change his life.
Later, Adams would write: “I knew my destiny… when I first experienced Yosemite.”

Majestic Landscapes Dominate TMA’s Ansel Adams: Early Works Show

The iconic work of one of the giants in the field of landscape photography is the focus of the Tyler Museum of Art’s exhibition, Ansel Adams: Early Works opening Sunday.

Ansel Adams’ Rare Photos of Everyday Life in a Japanese Internment Camp

Ansel Adams was already world-famous for his groundbreaking black-and-white photographs of the American West when he was invited by his friend Ralph Merritt to document the Manzanar War Relocation Center, a Japanese internment camp, where Merritt was director. It was a risky career move for a man so thoroughly established as a landscape photographer, but Adams was compelled to witness life there and make a record of it.

That Time When Ansel Adams Posed for a Baseball Trading Card

In the 1970s, photographer Mike Mandel asked his famous colleagues to pose for a pack of baseball cards. The results are as amazing as you’d imagine.
orget that 1989 Ken Griffey Jr. Upper Deck card or your 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle, the real baseball card prize is the Ansel Adams rookie. How many of you can say you have that in your parents’ attic?

The Adams card is one of 135 cards in the “Baseball Photographer Trading Cards” set, a whimsical and unique collectible that’s equal parts art and spoof.

Ansel Adams exhibit coming to Reynolda House in spring

An exhibition of work by Ansel Adams, an American photographer known for his luminous and detailed black-and-white nature photographs, will open at Reynolda House Museum of American Art on March 11, 2016 and hang through July 17.

Who brought Georgia O’Keeffe, D.H. Lawrence and Ansel Adams to New Mexico?

How does a socialite from Buffalo, New York become the center of a modernist movement in a town in the middle of the American Wild West?