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San Diego Museum Unveils ‘Fragile Waters’ Exhibit

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FRAGILE WATERS is a powerful artistic and ecological statement through the inspiring black and white images of three renowned photographers and environmentalists – Ansel Adams, Ernest H. Brooks II, and Dorothy Kerper Monnelly

Ansel Adams’ Son to Open Photo Exhibit’s West Coast Premiere

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The son of Ansel Adams, whose photos helped expand the national park system, will attend the opening festivities of the West Coast premiere of “Fragile Waters.” The traveling display of 119 photographs, many not previously exhibited, will be at the Maritime Museum of San Diego and feature black and white images by environmentalists Adams, Ernest H. Brooks II and Dorothy Kerper Monnelly.

Book review: 'Ansel Adams in Yosemite Valley: Celebrating the Park at 150'

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From age 14, photographer and conservationist Ansel Adams (1902–1984) visited Yosemite Valley annually. Adams once said: “Yosemite Valley, to me, is always a sunrise, a glitter of green and golden wonder in a vast edifice of stone and space.”

Market Snapshot: Ansel Adams

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Landscape photographer and environmental activist Ansel Adams's lucid black and white photographs of the American wilderness helped establish photography as a legitimate art form. A half-century later, there is still an unimpeachable interest in his work at virtually any price point. “Ansel’s work seems to be sort of a ‘gold standard’ in the photography market,” the artist’s grandson Matthew Adams, president of the Ansel Adams Gallery, told artnet via email. “His work has appreciated, and does fluctuate with the market in general, but doesn’t see the extreme highs and lows that we sometimes see with other photographers’ work.”

Ansel Adams Vintage Photographs

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“Vintage” is a term in photography that has both a very specific meaning, and unfortunately a slightly ambiguous definition when putting it into practice.

New Release - Monolith, the Face of Half Dome as a Modern Replica

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On an April morning in 1927, Adams undertook a difficult four-thousand-foot climb through heavy snow to the granite outcropping known as the Diving Board, where he set up his 6 1/2 x 8 1/2-inch view camera, inserted a glass plate, and waited for the light to fall directly on the sheer granite cliff. He made one exposure with a yellow filter. Then it occurred to him that if he used a dark red filter, both sky and cliff would register darker in the finished print than in the actual scene. He changed to the red filter, with this dramatic result.

A Yosemite Year – A Photographer’s Almanac April 2014 (Continued)

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A Quiet Day in The Mariposa Grove by Mike Reeves For April's post I wanted to show an image I took under what could be called making the best of a bad situation. In April 2012 I had been enjoying lunch along the river when I unfortunately cracked a tooth on what I was eating. Yosemite has a…

A Yosemite Year – A Photographer’s Almanac April 2014 (Continued)

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 Misty Sunrise from Tunnel View by Kirk Keeler From time to time, I will do some pre-planning to be in the right place at the right time to capture a natural phenomenon, such as a full moon rising behind a certain peak like Half Dome or Cathedral Peak.  Using software, such as The Photographer’s…