Entries by The Ansel Adams Gallery

Gallery History

In the summer of 1901, a landscape painter and political cartoonist for the San Francisco Chronicle by the name of Harry Best took an excursion to Yosemite Valley to camp and paint. Little did he know that this trip would have, indirectly, such an impact on so many.

Della Taylor Hoss

Between 1928 and 1942, Della lived in Yosemite Valley while her husband, Herman Hoss, was the federal magistrate and treasurer of Yosemite Park and Curry Company. In her 70’s she travelled to the White Mountains to see the Bristlecone Pines with a friend. Della was awestruck by the beauty of these 4,500 year old trees. She created a series of 15 stunning colored pencil charcoal drawings capturing the life and death struggle of these amazing trees.

Bob Kolbrener

Bob Kolbrener’s passion for fine art black and white photography began in 1968 when he innocently wandered into Best’s Studio (now The Ansel Adams Gallery) in Yosemite National Park. The magnificence of the Ansel Adams original prints were overwhelming, and he has been captivated by photography since.

Kerik Kouklis

Kerik Kouklis is a full-time fine art photographer and educator who specializes in creating handmade photographs. Kerik combines a contemporary eye with 19th century processes to produce work that is uniquely his own. Influenced by the pictorialists of the early 20th century, he makes images that can be at once calm and unsettling.

Anne Larsen

Anne Larsen received her formal photographic training in Denmark, where she worked as a successful photographer for one of the largest commercial studios in Copenhagen. In 1994 she moved to the United States, and has worked as John Sexton’s Photographic Assistant since that time.

Richard Lohmann

Richard Lohmann started making hand-coated platinum prints in 1977 in part, because he responded to the mood and character he saw in the vintage platinum prints of P.H. Emerson and Frederick H. Evans. He loved the work of early platinum revivalists like George Tice and Tom Millea, and was drawn to the ambiguous reference to time created by the print ‘s warm tones.